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W. S. Hoole Special Collections Library Manuscript Collections

Guide to the Central Plank Road Company, Tallassee Branch records MSS.0292

ASSET VIEWER
Publication:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Box 870266
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 35487-0266
205.348.0500
archives@ua.edu

December 2008

Creation:

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit 2012-12-10T09:44-0600

Language Usage:

English

Description Rules:

Describing Archives: A Content Standard

December 2012
Collection Title:

Central Plank Road Company, Tallassee Branch records

Unit ID:

MSS.0292

Repository:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Quantity:

0.4 Linear feet

Dates:

1850-1853

Abstract:

Charter and organizational information of the Tallassee Branch of the Central Plank Road Company

creator

Central Plank Road Company, Tallassee Branch. (1850-1853?)

Processing Information:

Processed by

unknown

Preferred Citation:

Central Plank Road Company, Tallassee Branch records, W.S. Hoole Special Collections Library, University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama.

Scope and Contents note

The collection contains the charter and organizational information of the Tallassee Branch of the Central Plank Road Company.

Access Restrictions:

None

Usage Restrictions:

None

Acquisition Information:

unknown

Biographical/Historical note

A plank road or puncheon is a dirt path or road covered with a series of planks, similar to the wooden sidewalks one would see in a Western movie. Plank roads were very popular in Ontario, the U.S. Northeast and U.S. Midwest in the first half of the 19th century. They were often built by turnpike companies. In the late 1840s plank roads led to an investment boom and subsequent bust. The first plank road in the US was built in North Syracuse, New York in order to transport salt and other goods; it appears to have copied earlier roads in Canada that copied Russian ones. The plank road boom was like many early technologies, promising to transform the way people lived and worked, and led to permissive changes in legislation seeking to spur development and speculative investment by private individuals. Ultimately the technology failed to live up to its promise and millions of dollars in investments evaporated almost overnight.

Source(s)

Alabama (localbroad)

Alabama--Industries (lcsh)

Business and Labor (localbroad)

Elmore County (Ala.) (lcsh)

Plank roads (lcsh)

Transportation--History--19th century (lcsh)

Travel and Tourism (localbroad)

Ledger Box 1765