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W. S. Hoole Special Collections Library Manuscript Collections

Guide to the County Council of Home Demonstration Clubs scrapbook MSS.0362

ASSET VIEWER
Publication:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Box 870266
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 35487-0266
205.348.0500
archives@ua.edu

February 2008

Creation:

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit 2013-02-14T15:32-0600

Language Usage:

English

Description Rules:

Describing Archives: A Content Standard

February 2013
Collection Title:

County Council of Home Demonstration Clubs scrapbook

Unit ID:

MSS.0362

Repository:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Quantity:

1.0 Linear feet

Dates:

1911

Abstract:

Scrapbook documenting the history of the Tuscaloosa (Alabama) Home Demonstration Club and includes photos, newspaper clippings, and club documents.

creator

County Council of Home Demonstration Clubs.

creator

Home Demonstration Club (Tuscaloosa, Ala.).

Scope and Contents note

The collection contains a scrapbook documenting the history of the Tuscaloosa Home Demonstration Club and includes photos, newspaper clippings, and club documents.

Preferred Citation:

County Council of Home Demonstration Clubs scrapbook, W.S. Hoole Special Collections Library, University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama.

Biographical/Historical note

In 1914, Congress passed the Smith-Lever Act, establishing the Cooperative Extension Service, whereby county agents would call on farm communities to teach farmers the latest agricultural technology and to also teach home economics to women and girls. Home Extension Agents made quite an impact on the often isolated communities they served, many of which were without electrical service, telephones, or even rural mail delivery.

Women as well as men were targeted in the federal government's efforts to institute rural improvement programs. Female home demonstration agents became familiar figures in rural communities. The clubs they organized provided training not only in nutrition, hygiene, and child-rearing techniques but also in craft skills useful to home-making and developing home industries. Handmade baskets using native materials such as pine straw were popular. Many women made rag rugs. However, not all crafts produced by home demonstration clubs were "folk" (i.e., representing a line of unbroken tradition) but many were. In fact, the home demonstration club functioned as a forum for the transmission of folk skills in many communities already deeply rooted in traditional activities.

Access Restrictions:

None

Usage Restrictions:

None

Acquisition Information:

unknown

Processing Information:

Processed by

unknown, 2008; updated by Martha Bace, 2013

Source(s)

Alabama (localbroad)

Clippings (information artifacts) (aat)

Community and Place (localbroad)

Daily Life and Family (localbroad)

Organizations (localbroad)

Photographs (aat)

Reports (aat)

Scrapbook Box 2464