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W. S. Hoole Special Collections Library Manuscript Collections

Guide to the Creek Indian Land Sales Collection MSS.0371

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Publication:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Box 870266
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 35487-0266
205.348.0500
archives@ua.edu

October 2009

Creation:

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit 2013-02-20T10:52-0600

Language Usage:

English

Description Rules:

Describing Archives: A Content Standard

February 2013
Collection Title:

Creek Indian Land Sales Collection

Unit ID:

MSS.0371

Repository:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Quantity:

0.05 Linear feet (6 Documents)

Dates:

1833-1841

Abstract:

Documents pertaining to the sale of lands belonging to Ko Yoo Quae, Alpetter Hadjo, Co Choc O Nee, Coch Che Yo Ho Lo, and Pelis-hart-ke - all Creek Indians living in Alabama between 1833 and 1841.

Scope and Contents note

The collection contains six documents pertaining to the sale of lands belonging to Ko Yoo Quae, Alpetter Hadjo, Co Choc O Nee, Coch Che Yo Ho Lo, and Pelis-hart-ke - all Creek Indians living in Alabama between 1833 and 1841.

Processing Information:

Processed by

Martha Bace, 2008; updated by Martha Bace, 2013

Preferred Citation:

The Creek Indian Land Sales Collection, W.S. Hoole Special Collections Library, University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama.

Acquisition Information:

Unknown

Usage Restrictions:

None

Access Restrictions:

None

Biographical/Historical note

Although the Creek Indians had been forced from Georgia, with many Lower Creeks moving to the Indian Territory, there were still about 20,000 Upper Creeks living in Alabama in the 1830s when the state moved to abolish tribal governments and extend state laws over the Creeks. Opothle Yohola appealed to the administration of President Andrew Jackson for protection from Alabama; when none was forthcoming, the Treaty of Cusseta was signed on 24 March 1832, which divided Creek lands into individual allotments. Creeks could either sell their allotments and receive funds to remove to the west, or stay in Alabama and submit to state laws. Land speculators and squatters began to defraud Creeks out of their allotments, and violence broke out, leading to the so-called "Creek War of 1836." Secretary of War Lewis Cass dispatched General Winfield Scott to end the violence by forcibly removing the Creeks to the Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River.

Source(s)

Alabama (localbroad)

Civil Rights and Human Rights (localbroad)

Creek Indian War (localbroad)

Creek Indians (lcsh)

Deeds (aat)

Government, Law and Politics (localbroad)

Indian land transfers (lcsh)

Native Americans (localbroad)

Alpetter Hadjo Land Contract Box 571 Folder 371.01

Ko Yoo Quae Land Contract Box 571 Folder 371.02

Co Chee O Nee Land Bond Box 571 Folder 371.03

Coch Che Yo Ho Lo Land Contract Box 571 Folder 371.04

Pelis-hart-ke letters of patent Box 571 Folder 371.05