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W. S. Hoole Special Collections Library Manuscript Collections

Guide to the Freemasons, Amity Lodge, No. 54, and Mt. Moriah Lodge, No. 19, resolution MSS.0542

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Publication:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Box 870266
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 35487-0266
205.348.0500
archives@ua.edu

February 2008

Creation:

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit 2013-04-09T09:16-0500

Language Usage:

English

Description Rules:

Describing Archives: A Content Standard

April 2013
Collection Title:

Freemasons, Amity Lodge, No. 54, and Mt. Moriah Lodge, No. 19, resolution

Unit ID:

MSS.0542

Repository:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Quantity:

0.05 Linear feet (1 item)

Dates:

circa 1866

Abstract:

An 1866 resolution addressed to President Andrew Johnson by two Alabama freemasons chapters, requesting the pardon and release of several associates.

creator

Freemasons. Amity Lodge No. 54 (Pickensville, Ala.).

creator

Freemasons. Mt. Moriah Lodge No.19 (Pickensville, Ala.).

Preferred Citation:

Freemasons, Amity Lodge, No. 54, and Mt. Moriah Lodge, No. 19, resolution, W.S. Hoole Special Collections Library, University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama.

Processing Information:

Processed by

unknown, 2008; updated by Martha Bace

Acquisition Information:

unknown

Usage Restrictions:

None

Access Restrictions:

None

Scope and Contents note

The collection contains an 1866 resolution addressed to President Andrew Johnson by two Greene County, Alabama freemasons chapters, requesting the pardon and release of several associates. The resolution contains the newspaper account of the incident and the related trial before a military commission.

Biographical/Historical note

During the Civil War and Reconstruction, military commissions were used in a variety of settings. Famously, the Supreme Court forbade their use in states that had not seceded and in which the courts were open. In the South, however, civilian courts were closed or could not be relied on to prosecute offenders against the Union.

Source(s)

Johnson, Andrew, 1808-1875 (Library_of_Congress_Name_Authority_File)

Government, Law and Politics (localbroad)

Organizations (localbroad)

Presidents (lcsh)

Resolutions (administrative records) (aat)

Resolution Box 640