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W. S. Hoole Special Collections Library Manuscript Collections

Guide to the "Mrs. Ina Marie Porter Ockenden, Alabama Women Writers, number VIII," The Montgomery Advertiser, September 10, 1911, page 1 MSS.3406

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Publication:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Box 870266
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 35487-0266
205.348.0500
archives@ua.edu

May 2011

Creation:

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit 2011-05-27T11:31-0500

Language Usage:

English

Description Rules:

Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Collection Title:

"Mrs. Ina Marie Porter Ockenden, Alabama Women Writers, number VIII," The Montgomery Advertiser, September 10, 1911, page 1 [photocopy]

Unit ID:

MSS.3406

Repository:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Quantity:

1.0 Linear feet

Dates:

1911 September 10

Abstract:

Photocopy of page one of the 10 September 1911 issue of The Montgomery Advertiser featuring Alabama writer, Mrs. Ina Marie Porter Ockenden. This was the eighth article in the series "Alabama Women Writers."

Access Restrictions:

None

Acquisition Information:

unknown

Preferred Citation:

"Mrs. Ina Marie Porter Ockenden, Alabama Women Writers, number VIII," The Montgomery Advertiser, September 10, 1911, page 1 [photocopy], W.S. Hoole Special Collections Library, University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Scope and Contents note

The collection contains a photocopy of page one of the 10 September 1911 issue of The Montgomery Advertiser featuring Alabama writer, Mrs. Ina Marie Porter Ockenden, the eighth article in the series, "Alabama Women Writers."

Biographical/Historical note

Ina Marie Porter Ockenden was born in Alabama about 1848. She was the daughter of Judge B. F. Porter and E. T. Kidd, and was graduated from the South Alabama Female College, Greenville, Alabama. She was married twice, first to G. L. Henry, and then to Albion Ockenden. She taught for several years, and also was a member of the Alabama Press Association, and was the first woman ever employed on the working force. She was an expert newspaper worker, and received the medal for the best advertising of the Gulf States during the Louisville Exposition, and a prize for the best trade issue of newspapers at New Orleans.

She edited the Southern Alabamian, Southern News and Greenville Advocate, was a frequent contributor to English and Scotch papers, and published many poems and stories in magazines relating to the South, and was the annual poet of the Editors and Publishers' Press Association. Her works include "Southria, a poem," "The Monument on Capitol Hill," as well as many magazine contributions.

Source: "The South in history and literature; a hand-book of southern authors, from the settlement of Jamestown, 1607, to living writers" by Mildred Lewis Rutherford, Atlanta, Georgia, The Franklin-Turner Company, 1907. [online: http://www.archive.org/stream/southinhistoryli00ruthuoft/southinhistoryli00ruthuoft_djvu.txt; accessed 27 May 2011]

Photocopy of Page 1 Box SC0068 Oversize Folder 3406.01