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A. S. Williams III Americana Manuscript Collections

Guide to the "Confederate memoirs," volumes II and III W.0012

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Publication:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Box 870266
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 35487-0266
205.348.0500
archives@ua.edu

August 2013

Creation:

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit 2013-11-15T14:38-0600

Language Usage:

English

Description Rules:

Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Collection Title:

"Confederate memoirs," volumes II and III

Unit ID:

W.0012

Repository:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Quantity:

0.2 Linear feet

Dates:

1861-1865

Location:

The A. S. Williams III Americana Collection, Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library, The University of Alabama

Abstract:

Unpublished typescript of the memoirs of twenty Confederate soldiers

creator

Williams, A. S., III

Access Restrictions:

None

Acquisition Information:

Gift of A. S. Williams III, 2010

Preferred Citation:

"Confederate memoirs," volumes II and III, The A. S. Williams III Americana Collection, University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Processing Information:

Processed by

Haley Aaron and Martha Bace, 2013

General note

Titles on phase box spines: Various Confederate Memoirs, volume II and volume III.

Scope and Contents note

The collection contains the unpublished typescript of the memoirs of twenty Confederate soldiers, including: (v. II) W. R. Kendall; Colonel Carter; Colonel McElroy; W. H. Blankenship; R. B. Rhea; Newton J. Stephens; J. B. Paris; W. G. Bennett; Jessie Gilley; John P. West; J. W. Prater; and (v. III) J. W. Prater (cont.); Newton Sewell; Joshua Morbut; W. M. Campbell; Thomas Blair; James B. Street; F. R. Bankoon; John M. Patterson; A. S. Heath; and G. A. Bitian.

For the most part, the memoirs are first-hand accounts of the battles these men went through, but there are a few second-hand stories, like that of Colonel Carter of the Thirteenth Mississippi in volume II. Carter was killed at Gettysburg, and while James, a former slave, could have remained in the North as a free man, he had promised his mistress that he would bring his master's body home if he should be killed. James had Carter embalmed and made the long trek back to Mississippi to deliver the body to the heartbroken widow.

Source(s)

Williams, A. S., III (local)

Confederate States of America--History (lcsh)

United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865 (lcsh)

Volume II Box W0012.01

Volume III Box W0012.02