acumen 3.0ɑ
A. S. Williams III Americana Manuscript Collections

Guide to the Booker T. Washington letter W.0136

ASSET VIEWER
Publication:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Box 870266
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 35487-0266
205.348.0500
archives@ua.edu

January 2014

Creation:

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit 2014-01-23T16:38-0600

Language Usage:

English

Description Rules:

Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Collection Title:

Booker T. Washington letter

Unit ID:

W.0136

Repository:

University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Quantity:

0.05 Linear feet

Dates:

1915 November 1

Abstract:

Letter from Booker T. Washington asking for financial support for the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute. The letter is dated November 12, 1915, two days before Washington's death.

Location:

The A. S. Williams III Americana Collection, Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library, The University of Alabama.

creator

Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute.

creator

Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915

creator

Williams, A. S., III

Acquisition Information:

Gift of A. S. Williams III, 2010

Preferred Citation:

Booker T. Washington letter, A. S. Williams III Americana Collection, University Libraries Division of Special Collections, The University of Alabama

Processing Information:

Processed by

Haley Aaron, 2013

General note

Title on box: A. S. Williams III Americana Collection - Small Collections

Scope and Contents note

This typescript letter from Booker T. Washington to Robert E. Ely is dated November 12, 1915, two days before Washington's death. In the letter, Washington urges Ely to support the Tuskegee Institute's scholarship fund. The typed letter includes Washington's signature.

Biographical/Historical note

Booker T. Washington was born a slave on April 5, 1856, in Hale's Ford, Virginia. After emancipation, his family resettled in West Virginia. He worked his way through Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute (now Hampton University) and attended college at Wayland Seminary (now Virginia Union University). In 1881 he was named as the first leader of the new Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

In addition to his contributions in education, Washington wrote fourteen books; his autobiography, Up From Slavery, first published in 1901, is still widely read today. During a difficult period of transition, he did much to improve the working relationship between the races. His work greatly helped blacks to achieve higher education, financial power, and understanding of the U.S. legal system.

Access Restrictions:

None

Source(s)

Ely, Robert E. (local)

Williams, A. S., III (local)

African Americans--Education, Higher (lcsh)

Educational fund raising (lcsh)

Tuskegee (Ala.) (lcsh)

Letter Box WSC001 Folder W0136.01